acceptance

‘We met the birth mom. ‘Come to the hospital to greet your daughter.’ Days later, I got an email: ‘Your birth mother has been located.’: Adoptee adopts child from birth mom and foster care, becomes birth mother

“My birth mother abandoned me. Months later, my new parents were given a picture. ‘This is your daughter now.’ When I met Danny, we both had this deep longing. ‘Let’s adopt!’ I opened my search for my biological family. 3 weeks after the adoption agency told us ‘it will take years for a child,’ we received the call that changed everything. A brave mama was waiting for us.”

‘They bluntly asked, ‘So, where is your real Mom? She didn’t want you? Is there something wrong with you?’ Everywhere I went, I stuck out like a sore thumb.’: Transracial adoptee says ‘it’s okay to grieve the loss of your birth family’

“I wasn’t white enough, but I also wasn’t black enough. I’d be in line checking out with my mom when cashiers would remind me to put down the grocery dividers between us. It was a constant reminder others didn’t see me as belonging to my parents. Every birthday, I wondered if my birth mother thought about me. Every holiday, I wondered if she missed me.”

‘A flu-like bug started spreading. ‘You’re black and strong, nothing will happen to you.’ The healthy white girl got her own room instead.’: Dancer powerfully explains ‘I will never color my shoes’

“The makeup artist takes 30 minutes to figure out my foundation color. The theaters ask me to find my own flesh-toned tights and undies because ‘they don’t know where to get my color.’ I do my own hair because the ladies don’t know what to do with my curls. I will NEVER COLOR my shoes.”

‘I saw you pushing a stroller with a tiny pink princess backpack hanging off your shoulder, your daughter giggling hysterically as you made silly sounds.’: Woman pens ode to black fathers, ‘Your love is as endless as your potential’

“I saw you verbally tap dance when the police pulled you over, carefully annunciating every syllable and narrating your movements. We locked eyes. Black father, you walk through a world where you’re stereotyped to death, but you still rise.”

‘I overheard Justin tell the kids, ‘You’re not allowed to scream in grocery stores. Someone might think I’m not your daddy.’: Woman details life in an interracial couple, ‘The past 12 years has been humbling’

“I notice the looks, the stares, the mean comments, the slammed doors as we approach people. When my husband and I started dating, I was nervous to introduce him to my family. He was Catholic, had a great job, and was incredibly kind. But, after all, he was black. Even though we are together, many people cannot understand it.”

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