be kind

‘I cried and cried as the nurse placed my helpless, tiny baby in a plastic take-out container. We left empty-handed, no physical proof our baby ever existed.’: Mom of angel baby urges ‘miscarriage matters’ after hospital negligence

“We were given no condolences. The doctor went straight to paperwork. I was nearly pleading for his attention now: ‘This life was important to me!’ He looked up, straight-faced and insincere. ‘Oh…sorry for your loss.’ I thought I’d at least get my baby back for a burial or cremation. The nurse broke the news over the phone. The remains of my teeny, tiny one would simply be destroyed.”

‘If you could, can you give my bonus points away to whoever scores the lowest?’: History teacher touched by student’s act of kindness, ‘Oddly enough, I was the one taught a lesson that day’

“It’s a mild, dreary February day in southeast Kentucky. It’s WWII exam day. 50 multiple choice questions, 100 points. Exams are distributed, students read and bubble, time passes. One student hands me his answer sheet and turns. As he walks away, I notice an asterisked note across the page. ‘Wait, what?’ So many questions rush in.”

‘What’s it like being a little person?’ I was touched without my consent and forced to apologize. I was so naive.’: Woman with Achondroplasia urges ‘I’m not a little person, I’m not a dwarf, I’m just Chandler’

“For so long, I thought the compliments were genuine. People would brag about how smart my brother was and be in awe over my sister’s art, while I got a pat on the head for just being…me. When I’d move my head out of the way and say, ‘Don’t pat my head,’ I got, ‘Your daughter shouldn’t talk to me like that. You should teach her manners.’ If I said ‘no’ when being asked if they could shake my hand, because they ‘always wanted to shake a little person’s hand,’ I was ‘rude.’ I felt trapped.”

‘I whipped around fast. ‘You leave him ALONE.’ He covered his ears, flapping his arms. The man snickered under his breath.’: 70-year-old woman thanks special needs mom for opening her eyes to autism, ‘You taught me patience and kindness’

“There was a grown man in his 40s. Something was off about him. He didn’t speak, but made a lot of noise. He was moving around, weaving in and out of the aisles. When he got to the checkout line, he got very animated about candy bars. An old man behind us snickered and under his breath said, ‘Hurry up.’ I would have never known if it wasn’t for you.”

‘I jokingly exclaim, ‘Where’s the better half?’ With a trembling voice, she says, ‘I don’t have him anymore.’ My heart sank.’: Man shares touching act of kindness for elderly neighborhood woman after husband dies

“‘Ma’am?’ I said as I approached her. I rushed down to the street, already feeling tight in my own chest. Tears streamed from behind her large sunglasses. Not another word was spoken. We hugged. Big hugs, like she was my mom or my grandmother. She sobbed into my chest and said, ‘I’m just trying to do the things we used to, so I still feel like he’s around.’ We never exchanged names.”

‘They wipe away tears on the tough days, they laugh with them on the good days. They build a confidence in our children we could not do ourselves.’: Mom thanks special needs teachers for their hard work, ‘They don’t get enough credit’

“I will never forget that first day having to leave him. I came home and cried because I was afraid he wouldn’t be understood. But he came out full of smiles and handed me a picture. One I knew he couldn’t have done by himself. He’d done it with his special needs assistant. I will always remember she said to me, ‘Mom, we did it together. And he chose red. I think it may be his color.’ And she was right. It still is.”

‘I was typing on a friend’s Facebook, ‘You’re so P-R-E-T…’ when I realized I was part of the problem. When did ‘pretty’ become the best compliment I could give?’: Woman urges ‘remind your friend she’s bold, brave, and inspiring’

“At one point, we were little girls dreaming of the day when we would be smart, successful, bold, brave, and strong. We would become doctors and lawyers and presidents. Then, the world told us what really matters most for girls: how we look.”

‘He’s a different kind of boy. He watches musicals, not football. He’s a rule follower, almost to a fault. He’s not ‘boy’ enough for the boys, and not ‘girl’ enough for the girls.’: Mom’s plea to teach kindness to our kids, ‘All differences should be valued’

“He is sensitive and shy. The misbehavior associated with ‘boys being boys’ does not apply to him. He finishes library books in 2 days and eats his lunch in order of healthiest to least healthy. His punctuality is constant and profound. Yet another day he came home, reduced to tears after no one wanted to be in a group with him during gym class. Another day he bows his head, in fear he will be mocked.”

 Share  Tweet