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‘Mom—a MOUNTAIN! Can we climb it?’ She believes her $10 Amazon dress transforms her into a magical princess.’ Mom urges others to say ‘yes’ to magic every chance they get

“She wanted to dress like Elena of Avalor for church today. Which is why, at 35 years old, I fight my instinct to say ‘no’ to magic as often as possible. I want my children to savor the weirdness of their childhood as long as the world will allow it. I want my daughter to believe in goblins and fairies and princess warriors.”

‘Did she stick her finger in the power socket?,’ strangers asked. They were being ignorant, insensitive.’: Little girl embraces ‘fuzzy’ hair caused by Uncombable Hair Syndrome, ‘I look like a lion with a crazy mane’

“She was picture perfect, blonde hair, blue eyes, so cliché. But around 3 months, we noticed something different. Her hair was growing straight up, not flattening down. It glistened in the light. ‘What’s wrong with her hair?’ Complete strangers would peer into her stroller, stare, take pictures without asking. One lady said, ‘Your daughter looks just like Doc Brown, the crazy scientist from Back to the Future!’ Our little girl was so special.”

‘We nicknamed her Chucky, from the horror films!’ Her hair got crazier, bigger. Wiry, matted, like it was crimped.’: Mom shocked by daughter’s ‘wool-like matted mess’ blonde hair, learns of rare ‘Uncombable Hair Syndrome’ diagnosis

“She was born with a head of thick, jet black, fluffy hair! But overnight, her hair came through poker straight, and pure white-blonde. She looked like a newborn, fluffy chick! Her hair looked full of static, wiry, like sheep’s wool. Slowly, it became worse. Hard to control. It got bigger, wilder as she grew, painful to brush. A lady mentioned it, but to be honest, I thought nothing of it. Then I realized it might be a problem.”

‘I’d cash my check for thousands, cry-jerk alone in bed, hop in my Rolls-Royce, and pretend it never happened.’: 26-year-old woman ditches deceivingly ‘glamorous’ lifestyle, now living life ‘truly, unapologetically’

“I was making 6 figures, had 3 cars. My ‘friends’ would come for parties in my huge house. But the second I was blackout drunk, not a single soul noticed or cared to ask where I was. In my OWN house. I’d wake in the bathroom, wipe off the vomit, then scroll through photos of me looking perfect, side by side girls with shots in hand, with captions like, ‘best friends forever.’ It literally made me sick.”

‘My good friend asked if I could do her a favor and wear a wig to her wedding. She wants us all to ‘look good’. My friends have always known me as the girl with no hair.’: Bald woman offended when pressured to ‘match’ at friend’s wedding

“I’ve already paid for a dress, shoes, plane tickets, and deposit. A realistic wig is VERY expensive. We’re wearing matching dresses. Why isn’t that enough? Is being bald so hideous I’ll ruin her pictures? I know it’s ‘her day’, but isn’t there a line?'”

‘I had to wear a wig on my wedding day. ‘What’s going on?!’ my mom asked. ‘I don’t know,’ I lied. It was my dirty little secret. I was a prisoner of my own body, and I put myself there.’

“I had anxiety about what people would say to my son about my hair. Would he be teased because of me? I just couldn’t do that to him. I bought a wig and started an 18-year game of hide-my-hair. I couldn’t believe what I was doing to myself. Each day, I hoped no one caught me.”

‘I held this dark secret. I remember thinking, ‘What the heck? Are people weird like me, too?’ Cruel kids would ask, ‘What are you doing? Why are you pulling out your hair?’ I’m done hiding.’

“When I was 8 years old, I vividly remember pulling out an eyelash as I sat in my mom’s car in the drive-thru. And you know what? I LIKED the feeling from it. It was oddly satisfying. I kept pulling them out until my eyelashes were bald. Then, my parents began to notice. They couldn’t accept I was doing this to myself.”

‘I bet you’re glad someone actually wanted you.’ Black? Adopted by a white, Mennonite family?’: Adopted woman finally accepts she’s ‘innately enough’ after years of torment for ‘mixed-race’ family

“I’m 7 when a stranger approaches, points. ‘Who does she belong to?’ ‘Where are your real parents?’ I’m 12 and a group of boys spit on me, call me racist slurs. My crush’s mom tells me he isn’t allowed to be with people ‘like me.’ I can’t sleep. ‘You’re not really black.’ ‘You can’t really be Mennonite.’ I’m just now learning to be gentle with myself, and my past.”

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