parenthood

‘When I walked into that hospital room and lay eyes on these perfect little strangers, I knew in my bones they belonged to me.’: Adoptive mom says ‘it’s the choice to parent that makes you one’

“Within seconds of feeling the weight of my babies against my chest for the first time, my heart was made to love them. It was an unexplainable love at first sight I thought was only reserved for mothers who gave birth to their children. And now, a decade later, science is proving what I’ve always known in my heart.”

‘We arrived in Daytona Beach on a red-eye flight to discover the hotel we booked had been demolished weeks earlier.’: Mom hilariously compares Spring Break ’00 to now

“Picture it: Spring Break, 2000. We spent the week playing volleyball in the burning sand and drinking $1 rum concoctions as Sisqó’s ‘Thong Song’ pounded through the speakers of every club we went to. It was inconvenient, exhausting, and absolutely amazing. Spring break at 40 looks a little different.”

‘I’m going to miss this. The dishes can wait, the laundry can wait. But those sweet little feet chasing us around, they’re getting a little bigger every day.’: Mom urges ‘don’t let the goodness of today pass you by’

“The look in his eyes when he sees me. The way he snuggles into position to fall asleep. The sound of his favorite word on repeat: ‘Ma-ma.’ Being his cushion, his happy place. I wouldn’t trade this for anything. I don’t ever want to forget how it feels to be his person.”

‘While gathering laundry, my eye caught sight of my son’s shirt. Honestly, I almost walked right by it. But something was different about this.’: Mom urges ‘children are doing the best they can’ 

“It’s the first time my son has taken off his church button-up and replaced it on his hanger. No, it’s not perfect. Yes, it’s still disheveled. But he was trying to do the right thing…completely unprompted. So often, we walk right by our children’s best efforts.”

‘Raising kids without my mother is much, much harder than I thought.’: Woman details parenthood after loss of mother, ‘It’s like driving without a GPS’

“‘Go ahead, I’ll watch the kids.’ The woman walks off, alone. She’ll be back soon, and anyway, her mother loves time with the grandkids. She’ll get a kick of watching the 3-year-old go up and down the tiny plastic slide. After the play space, they’ll do a little more shopping and grab lunch at the Food Court. Mostly, they’ll talk. It’s a common scene. But it makes a lump rise in my throat. I used to do this sort of thing, before my mom got too sick.”

‘I told my wife to clean. She spent time talking to friends instead, so I gave her something to cry about.’: Mom’s clever plea to show compassion to our kids, ‘Hold your child a little tighter tonight’

“‘Today, I smacked her. She got really upset because I refused to buy her some chocolate. I told her she’s not going out with her friends this weekend now. If she can’t be bothered to do the simple things I’ve told her to, why should she get to do nice things?’ We really wouldn’t tolerate it between adults…so why should we do it with children?”

‘I lost my virginity without my consent. I went from pregnant at 15 to waking up in county jail with a suicide suit on.’: Woman details battle with addiction, self-love, ‘I decided to choose life instead’

“I spent 10 years numbing my pain, always trying to be the loudest in the room to hide the shame. In the depths of my darkness, being a young mom just wasn’t an option. The party life was for me. Until I met Eric. We met on an online dating app, then locked eyes at the gym, not knowing the other would be there. I knew instantly I would spend the rest of my life with him. I had to make a decision: be ashamed of my journey, or allow it to propel me forward.”

‘What happens to my girl when society realizes it’s not ‘cute’ anymore? How do I make people see the beauty I see?’: Mom to daughter with autism urges us to challenge our idea of beauty

“When she was 2, she didn’t talk. She said one word, ‘Hi,’ over and over. I was worried, but most agreed it was so cute. At 4, she stuffed food in her mouth messily. Gosh, it was cute. At 6, she was diagnosed. Everyone agreed she was still cute, but followed with smiles of pity. Now, she’s 11. She picks her nose, sits with her legs wide open. She has body odor, speech delays, and drools. What happens to my girl when society decides it’s not ‘cute’ anymore?”

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